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Coolant Pressure / "Head Gasket" Test on a 6.0L Powerstroke

***PLEASE READ THIS!*** This test can help determine if your 6.0L (or any other engine really) has a blown head gasket. However, on a 6.0L it can also help determine OTHER issues as well, such as a bad EGR cooler, or in my case - it lead to diagnosing a bad OIL cooler! In order to distinguish between a head gasket and an EGR issue, you have to take into account OTHER symptoms, such as coolant loss, smoke, and oil condition. Overall PRESSURE is really NOT the problem! It's how QUICKLY it gets there! Your ove, this is NORMAL - especially if pulling a trailer or climbing a long grade. Overall pressure can climb to 15+psi simply due to combination of a full or overfilled system, and high (but normal) coolant temperature. Too much temperature and you will overpressure the system and overheat if you push it far enough! More videos to come!


 


More Videos...


6.0L POWERSTROKE - HEAD GASKET TEST
A quick and easy approach to determining head gasket or EGR cooler failure. This is the method we use every day.





HEAD GASKET TEST for 6.0 POWERSTROKE
steps that I use every day to determine if a truck has headgasket issues or EGR cooler failure.





Peugeot 106 Head Gasket Replacement





How to Test Head Gasket
** Please see my other videos on this topic* Thx! This video is intended for those who would like to know how to confirm a damaged head gasket on a vehicle prior to making the decision to invest a lot of money for repair. My apologies for the camera focus- next video I will pay closer attention, but the information needed is viewable. Further research should be done on the risks of overheating to the engine block and such. This video is meant to simply show a 'how to' on the test method I used quite often when professionally working on vehicles, the results of which are based on chemistry and industry-standards of the time (1990's). I hope you find this video useful. RI.





How to change a Subaru Head Gasket without removing the engine
These are the sets I like to use on these EJ25 engines. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000C2AISU/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=U TF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B000C2AISU&linkCode=as2&tag=httpww wyou00f-20 1:07 Identifying engine type 1:25 Inspection showing oil leak from head gasket 3:12 Remove air intake (discussed) 3:35 Remove battery (discussed) 4:00 Remove air compressor (discussed) 4:10 With above removed and belt covers removed 4:20 Remove belts 5:49 Remove A/C compressor tensioner bracker 7:00 Remove alternator 8:50 Remove air compressor (discussed) 8:56 Drain radiator 10:10 Remove power brake Booster vacuum line, fuel lines 11:48 Disconnect spark plug wires/brackets 13:42 Remove A/C compressor 14:15 Remove spark plugs/bracket 15:02 Disconnect oil sending unit wire, coolant temp sending unit, crack shaft position sensor wire 15:50 Remove radiator´╗┐ How to change a Subaru Head Gasket without removing the engine





Replace a Cylinder Head Gasket Yourself and do it RIGHT! Part 1
Thoroughly detailed video on replacing your head gasket on any vehicle- though a Toyota 2.2L is used in the example. Includes measuring warpage specifications, special tools needed, proper techniques, and options to consider such as machine shop services, used vs new cylinder heads, and more! Part 2 is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDf_IrEEbYg&google_comment_id=z121zp4zooejfr spx04cengglny4exwbmrg0k&google_view_type#gpluscomments You might also be interested in head gasket diagnosis video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVn-IDi7da8





Engine coolant system and compression testing
There are lots of ways to diagnose a head gasket or to check the general health of an engine, but this video is focusing on 3 major systems. 1) The coolant system 2) The combustion chamber 3) The valvetrain COOLANT SYSTEM PRESSURE TEST: The boiling point of water (coolant) RISES under pressure. It's imperative that the coolant system has NO AIR in it, no leaks, a known-good thermostat, and a good radiator cap in order to function properly. If the pressure stamped on your radiator cap is not being achieved, Boyle's law is not taking affect, and your coolant will boil when the car is being driven at it's normal operating temperature, and may exhibit signs of a blown head gasket. Many have cursed the process of burping all the air out, sometimes even taking several days and heat cycles to complete the process. COMPRESSION TEST: The point of a compression test is to diagnose the health of each combustion chamber. A compression test is a crude test to determine if a ring, valve seal, valve, or a head gasket problem exists. It will show immediately in this test because the gauge will not rise to the pressure specified for your engine. There are 3 numbers you need regarding your car's setup. High limit, Low Limit and Range. The high limit is specified by your car's manufacturer and reflects the equipment they used to build the engine. If you EXCEED the high limit, chances are it's caused by excessive carbon build-up, and a Seafoam or MCCC treatment will usually remove the carbon and return it to an acceptable value. If that build-up isn't caused by cheap gas, then it's likely the car has an EGR problem or excessive oil blow-by leading to this situation. The Low Limit represents the point in which the combustion chamber is not able to compress the engine's specified fuel to the point where it can ignite it. Gasoline and air need to be compressed together in order for the energy stored in that fuel to be released. If it isn't achieved, it will only burn, and not explode. Lower-than-Low Limit pressure means it's time to rebuild the engine because one of the sealing components in the combustion chamber has failed or is in need of servicing. Either way, it's expensive because working on the combustion chamber requires extensive disassembly or unusual tools that the average mechanic doesn't have. Range specifies how many PSI of variance there can be between ALL of your compression numbers. If there's a large variance on one cylinder, then the engine will not run smoothly. If a cylinder is below spec, it may feel like a misfire even though the plug is getting spark. If all the values are close, the engine idles and revs more smoothly. Aftermarket cams, pistons, head gaskets or machining will affect the results of your tests. A higher compression piston or thinner head gasket can raise the compression numbers slightly. A thicker head gasket or longer-duration cams will lower compression slightly. I don't know how to determine exact numbers because I'm not an engineer, but you should remember that during testing if your engine is modified. So in a nutshell, you want your numbers to be close and between the high and low limits. If a test fails, the only way to determine WHAT failed is to perform a leakdown test. Modifications to the factory internals or machining WILL change the OEM compression limit values, but NOT the range value. LEAKDOWN TEST: I'm not using a real leakdown tester in this video. A real leakdown tester has a regulator, a pressure gauge, a restrictor, and another pressure gauge. You measure the value of the post-restrictor gauge vs. the regulated supply and mark the percentage of pressure-drop. As a general rule, most cars are healthy around a 20% value. Race engines should be between 1-10% for highest performance. I'm using the ghetto method for this test. Get the piston roughly at Top Dead Center, apply air pressure, fine tune TDC for that piston by turning the crank with a wrench to see if you can stop all of the airflow. Listen to the intake for leaking air to determine if there's a bad intake valve. Listen to the tailpipe for leaking Exhaust valves. If neither are leaking, but air is still flowing, remove the tool and pour a cap of oil into the spark plug hole so that it coats the rings to make a better seal. After oiling, re-install the tool and repeat the test to see if you get better results. If you do, you have bad rings. If you don't, you have bad valve stem seals, a blown head gasket, or a cracked head. If you have a cracked head or bad head gasket, then there will likely be pressure venting through your coolant system. Taking off the radiator cap and watching for air rising to the filler neck will point you in the right direction.





BUYER BEWARE FORD POWERSTROKE DIESEL
How not to be victimized by unscrupulous people misrepresenting a truck as having low miles.





DEALERPROOFING YOUR 6.0L, 6.4L POWERSTROKE - LIFETIME WARRANTY
PowerStrokeHelp.com has taken the repair of the 6.0L and 6.4L PowerStroke diesel engines to a new level. LIFETIME GUARANTEE HEAD GASKETS





Powerstroke 6.0 PMM Coolant Filter Install - Part 1
In this video I unbox and install the Performance Machine & Manufacturing coolant filter for the 6.0L Powerstroke. Installation was super easy and took less than 30 minutes to complete.





Ford 6.7L Powerstroke Turbo Removal- A Royal Pain!
In this video I show you how to remove the turbo off a stock 6.7L all years.





DIY 6.0l Powerstroke Diesel Cooling System Pressure Test
Home made cooling system pressure test setup bought everything I needed at TSC for under $30





How To Replace The Head Gasket and Intake Manifold Gaskets On A GM 3800 Engine
In this walkthrough I replace the head gaskets, upper intake manifold (UIM) gaskets, and lower intake manifold (LIM) gaskets on a 1997 pontiac bonneville. These steps will be identical for almost any GM 3800 / 3400 / 3100 series II motor. If you have any questions feel free to post them on the video and I'll do my best to try to help! Here is a link to the the text walkthrough I used as a guide for making this video: http://www.w-body.com/showthread.php/49858-Any-info-on-changing-series-2-38 00-head-gaskets Also here's a list of torque specs for most of the motor: Camshaft Bolt: 74 ft/lbs + 90 degrees angle torque Camshaft thrust plate: 132 in/lbs (T30 torx) Front cover bolts: 15 ft/lbs + 40 degrees angle torque Oil pan bolts: 125 in/lbs Crank sensor nuts: 18 ft/lbs Camshaft sensor bolts 48 in/lbs Lifter hold-downs: 22 ft/lbs Rocker bolts: 11 ft/lbs(132in/lbs) + 90 degrees angle torque Lower intake bolts: 132 in/lbs Supercharger bolts: 17ft/lbs Crank Bolt: 111 ft/lbs + 76 degrees angle torque up to 10/98 111 ft/lbs +114 degrees angle torque 10/98 and up Cylinder head bolts: 37 ft/lbs + 130 degrees + 30 degrees up to 10/98 37 ft/lbs + 120 degrees Flywheel/flexplate bolts: 132 in/lbs + 50 degrees Exhaust manifolds: stud/nuts 132 in/lbs Nuts 156 in/lbs Oil filter adapter to timing cover: 22 ft/lbs 97 earlier 132 in/lbs + 50 degrees 97 and later Oil pump Cover to timing cover: 98 in/lbs Pick up tube and screen: 132 in/lbs Valve cover bolts: 89 in/lbs Tstat bolts: 21 ft/lbs Water Pump: 132 in/lbs + 80 degrees Water pump pulley: 115 in/lbs Throttle body: 84-89 in/lbs Fuel rail nuts: 75-84 in/lbs





6.0L egr cooler/oil cooler replacement
my buddy picked this truck up for 5000 knowing it had problems so we are just changing the oil and egr coolers and capping off the end of the egr cooler so the Exhaust doesnt heat up the coolant. he is going to try to get a few months out if it like this then do the bulletproofing with studs and gaskets and probably new heads and Exhaust but for now he needs the truck running so he can finish up the season. it is quite a job but with a hand full of hand tools and a pop crate to stand on you can just take your time with it and get it done yourself then we cheeched! thanks for watching!





1986 F-250 6.9L IDI Diesel Injection Pump Replacement (Repair Part 2)
After replacing the injectors (and the return lines), it still smoked white constantly. Timing made very little difference, as well as replacing the valve at the top front of the injection pump. So, here we are, replacing the injection pump! This truck sat for 3 or 4 years, which is probably why the injection pump no longer operated correctly. Before it ran at all I had to get the fuel cut off assembly unstuck, so the rest of the old pump is probably gummed up badly.





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